You Left Me



Analysis of the Love Poem by Emily Dickinson

You left me, sweet, two legacies, -
A legacy of love
A Heavenly Father would content,
Had He the offer of;

You left me boundaries of pain
Capacious as the sea,
Between eternity and time,
Your consciousness and me.

The Poem

“You Left Me” is an amazingly concise poem. It communicates two immense ideas in the short space of two four-line stanzas.

Clearly, Emily Dickinson wrote the poem about somebody that was dear to her. It’s not clear whether the poem is about somebody who is far away or is about somebody who has died. Both were common in her life. The enduring nature of the poem is such that its meaning is consistent with either case and also consistent with additional cases where there is a physical or emotional separation between two people.

Chronologically, the poem was probably written in 1862, during the period of Dickinson’s most intense writing. In 1862 she wrote about 366 poems.

Her dear friend, Reverend Charles Wadsworth, left for San Francisco in 1862, and he is most likely the subject of the poem. Dickinson met him in Philadelphia in 1855 and only met him in person on two other occasions, including his visit to see her just before he left for San Francisco. However, her emotional attachment to Wadsworth remained strong for the rest of her life and she wrote him many letters. She called him her “dearest earthly friend.” Unfortunately, most of her letters to Wadsworth have not survived, and his letters to her were burned, at her request, after her death.

The first stanza of the poem, “You Left Me,” tells of being left with a deep love, one that even the Heavenly Father would be content with. That’s an impressive statement and makes any further description unnecessary.

The second stanza talks about an emptiness that has been left. It’s obviously a huge pain, as big as the sea and compared to eternity. This legacy stands as a significant contrast to the legacy described in the first stanza.

A third stanza to tie everything together into a conclusion was not written. The last line of the second stanza, “Your consciousness and me,” seems to sufficiently bring the reader back from the two huge ideas just presented to the groundedness of the consciousness of two real people.

The stanzas are written very tightly with a ballad meter, iambic tetrameter followed by iambic trimeter. The rhyme is also very precise in the second and fourth lines of each stanza. There are no near rhymes in this poem. Also, the use of anaphora, the repetition of “You left me” to start each stanza, helps to create a very tightly designed poem.

As a result of these poetic features, Dickinson was able to create an easily understandable yet highly meaningful short poem. The skill and the insights are both impressive.

Characteristics of Emily Dickinson’s Poetry

Emily Dickinson’s sister, Lavinia, gathered Emily’s poems and had them published in 1890. Editors changed some of her words, punctuations, and capitalizations to make them conform to a certain standard. Later editions restored Dickinson’s unique style and organized them in a roughly chronological order.

Emily Dickinson’s poems have many identifiable features. Her poems have been memorized, enjoyed, and discussed since their first publication. Many critics consider her to have been extraordinarily gifted in her abilities to create concise, meaningful, and memorable poems.

The major themes in her poetry include Friends, Nature, Love, and Death. Not surprisingly, she also refers to flowers often in her poems. Many of her poems’ allusions come from her education in the Bible, classical mythology, and Shakespeare.

Dickinson did not give titles to her poems, an unusual feature. Others have given titles to some of her poems, and often the first line of the poem is used as a title.

She wrote short lines, preferring to be concise in her images and references. A study of her letters to friends and mentors shows that her prose style was composed of short iambic phrases, making her prose very similar to her poetry.

Dickinson’s poems are generally short in length, rarely consisting of more than six stanzas, as in “Because I Could Not Stop for Death.” Many of her poems are only one or two stanzas in length. The stanzas are quatrains of four lines. Some poems have stanzas of three or two lines.

The rhythm in many of her poems is called common meter or ballad meter. Both types of meter consist of a quatrain with the first and third lines having four iambic feet and the second and fourth lines having three iambic feet. The iambic foot is a unit of two syllables with the first syllable unstressed and the second syllable stressed.

In her quatrains the rhyme scheme is most often abcb, where only the second and fourth lines rhyme. Such a rhyme scheme is typical of a ballad meter.

Many other poems are written in a meter that is typical of English hymns. This rhythm pattern is characterized by quatrains where lines one, two, and four are written in iambic trimeter and the third line is written in iambic tetrameter.

Often her rhymes are near rhymes or slant rhymes. A near rhyme means that the two rhyming words do not rhyme exactly. They only make a near match.

In Dickinson’s poems, capitalizations and punctuations are unorthodox. She regularly capitalized the nouns but sometimes she was inconsistent and a few nouns were not capitalized. For punctuation, she frequently used a dash instead of a comma or a period, and sometimes she used a dash to separate phrases within a line. Some editions of her poems have attempted to correct the punctuation of her poems.

A dozen or more composers have set Dickinson’s poems to music, including Aaron Copland who produced “Twelve Songs on Poems of Emily Dickinson” in 1951. 0ne of the interesting ways to treat some of Dickinson’s most famous poems, often learned in school, is to sing them to the tune of “Amazing Grace,” or “The Yellow Rose of Texas, or most humorously, the theme to “Gilligan’s Island.”

Emily Dickinson’s Life

Emily Dickinson was an innovative and talented American poet who wrote nearly 1800 poems during her brief lifetime from 1830 to 1886. Dickinson became publicly well known as a poet only after her death because she chose to publish only a very small number of her poems, somewhere between seven and twelve, during her lifetime.

Emily Dickinson was born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a well known family. Her grandfather helped to found Amherst College and her father, a lawyer, served for numerous years in the Massachusetts legislature and in the United States Congress. Dickinson had a one year older brother and a three years younger sister.

As a young girl and teenager Dickinson acquired many friends, some lasting a lifetime, received approval and attention from her father, and behaved fittingly for a girl during the Victorian era. She received a classical education from the Amherst Academy and was required by her father to read the Bible. Though she attended church regularly only for a few years, her Christian foundation remained strong throughout her life.

Dickinson attended nearby Mount Holyoke College for only one year, due to numerous reasons, and then was brought back home by her brother, Austin. The Dickinson family lived in a home overlooking the town’s cemetery, where she is buried, for a few years before moving into the home her grandfather had built, called “The Homestead.”

At home in Amherst, Dickinson became a capable housekeeper, cook, and gardener. She attended local events, became friends with some of her fathers’ acquaintances, and read a number of books given to her by her friends and her brother. Most books had to be smuggled into the home for fear that her father would disapprove of them.

Emily Dickinson enjoyed the writings of an impressive list of contemporaries such as Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Longfellow, Whittier, Lowell, and Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. She also read from the Victorians, Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Thomas Carlyle, and George Eliot, and the Romantic poet Lord Byron. She also loved “David Copperfield” by Charles Dickens. When she discovered Shakespeare she asked, “Why is any other book needed?” In her home she hung portraits of Eliot, Browning, and Carlyle.

Dickinson grew more reclusive into the 1850’s. She began writing poems and received favorable response from her friends. Throughout the rest of her life she adopted the friendly practice of giving poems to her friends and bouquets of flowers from her garden. Her garden was so varied and well-cared that she was better known as a gardener than a poet.

During the Civil War years of the early 1860’s, Emily Dickinson wrote more than 800 poems, the most prolific writing period of her life. During this period Dickinson saw the death of several friends, a teacher, and the declining health of her mother who she had to tend closely. These unhappy events saddened Dickinson and led her to treat the subject of death in many of her poems.

Following the Civil War and for the remaining 20 years of her life, Dickinson rarely left the property limits of The Homestead. Her father, mother, and sister Lavinia all lived with her at home, and her brother lived next door at The Evergreens with his wife, Susan, a longtime friend to Emily, and their children. She enjoyed the company of her family and wrote often to her friends, but residents of Amherst only knew her as the “woman in white” when they infrequently saw her greeting visitors.

After several friends, a nephew, and her parents died, Dickinson wrote fewer and fewer poems and stopped organizing them, as she had been doing for many years. She wrote that, “the dyings have been too deep for me.” Dickinson developed a kidney disease which she suffered from for the remaining two years of her life. The final short letter that she wrote to her cousins read, “Little Cousins, Called Back. Emily.”

If you would like to read and learn about one of Emily Dickinson's most famous poems, though not a love poem, "Because I Could Not Stop For Death," click here.



Return to INDEX

Next Love Poem

If you have a comment about this love poem or any of the romantic love poems please use the Contact Us form. Also, if you have a favorite romantic love poem that you would like to see included here please use the Contact Us form.


Selected Site Reviews
AmericanSingles * AForeignAffair * Amigos * AsiaFriendFinder * BigChurch * BlackSinglesConnection * CherryBlossoms * ChristianSoulmates * Date * eHarmony * FitnessSingles * FriendFinder * FrenchFriendFinder * Glimpse * HurryDate * JewishCafe * JewishFriendFinder * Lavalife * Match * Matchmaker * Metrodate * OneandOnly * SeniorFriendFinder * Tickle * UDate * YahooPersonals